SCIENCE

The New Science of Mind and Brain (Online)

Micro-credential

Explore the latest research findings investigating mind-brain relationships and their application to real-world issues with this 15-point micro-credential, comprising 8 weekly modules.

Recommended Background

  • University Entrance (or equivalent) required
  • No specific experience or qualifications required

 Only available to NZ citizens & permanent residents

Duration

8 Weeks

 

Next Start Dates

Q3 – 8 July 2024

Applications closes one week before the course starts.

Apply early to secure your spot.

Domestic Fees

$1,336.50*

Course Overview

This micro-credential provides learners with knowledge and understanding of the latest findings and research methods for investigating mind-brain relationships, together with an appreciation of relationships between Mātauranga Māori and contemporary neuroscience. It has been designed for individuals working in a variety of occupations, especially in education, health, social services, human resources, police and corrections settings.
A wide range of topics are explored, including: gross anatomy of the brain; structure and function of nerve cells; perception; attention; memory; language; thinking; emotion; consciousness; neurodiversity; and ageing.
You will develop critical and analytic thinking skills enabling you to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of novel research, and to apply this knowledge and understanding to real-world problems. Successful completion will enable you to adopt and advocate for open-minded attitudes towards neurodiverse individuals, and those experiencing neurological conditions.

Course Brochure

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This micro-credential provides a tightly-focused introduction to contemporary findings and perspectives in the science of mind and brain. A strong focus is placed on the value of recent advances in basic knowledge for understanding real-world issues and addressing practical problems. Relationships between contemporary neuroscience and Mātauranga Māori are also considered.
Module Description
Introducing the brain The New Science of Mind and Brain will begin by reflecting on the wonder and fascination inspired by contemplating the brain – perhaps the most complex object in the known universe – and its relationship to human experience and behaviour. This introductory module will also examine: Mātauranga Māori perspectives; the anatomy of the brain; and the structure and function of nerve cells.
Perceiving the world How do visual perceptions arise from brain processes? Remarkable progress towards answering this question has been made in recent times. This module will examine the psychology and neuroscience of sensory processes and perception.
The attentive brain Sometimes we fail to see things right in front of us, even though our eyes are wide open. This module will explore the topic of attention, and consider some everyday problems related to attention and distraction.
Remembering What is it like to suffer from amnesia? What is the difference between short-term (working) memory and long-term memory? Why do we sometimes misremember things that happened yesterday (or last year)? This module will examine the psychology and neuroscience of memory.
The communicative brain What is language? How does language develop during infancy and childhood? How is language represented in the brain? New insights about these issues, emerging from research into the psychology and neuroscience of language will be explained.
Thinking and feeling A range of topics related to thinking and feeling will be discussed in this module. These include: obstacles to problem-solving and how to overcome them; expert problem-solving; mental shortcuts – their upsides and downsides; the psychology and neuroscience of emotions.
The diverse brain Since we differ from each other in a multitude of fascinating ways, it follows that our brains also differ. This module will examine and celebrate several dimensions of neurodiversity, including the autism spectrum, ADHD and ageing.
The conscious brain How does conscious experience emerge from activity in brains and bodies? Answering this question is seen by many scholars as the most significant intellectual challenge of our times. In this module we will examine scientific and philosophical attempts to unravel the enigma of the conscious brain.
Students who complete this micro-credential will be able to:

  1. describe the main divisions of the nervous system and the gross anatomy of the brain; and be able to label the principal structures when shown diagrams of individual nerve cells, or diagrams of the human brain
  2. demonstrate an appreciation of relationships between Mātauranga Māori and contemporary neuroscience
  3. critique a range of methods for studying relationships between brain and mind by evaluating their respective advantages and disadvantages
  4. explain the neurocognitive basis of a range of psychological processes and be able to apply this understanding to real-world settings
  5. describe the main features of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum conditions, attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder and developmental dyslexia
  6. describe how a range of psychological processes are affected by healthy ageing, and describe neurocognitive aspects of dementia (especially Alzheimer’s disease)
  7. explain how improved scientific understanding of the neurocognitive basis of psychological processes can alter perceptions of practical issues, and suggest evidence-based solutions.

Upon completion of the course, you will :

  • be awarded with 15 credit points from the University of Auckland
  • be issued with a digital badge from the University of Auckland which you can share across your digital profiles like LinkedIn.
This micro-credential provides a tightly-focused introduction to contemporary findings and perspectives in the science of mind and brain. A strong focus is placed on the value of recent advances in basic knowledge for understanding real-world issues and addressing practical problems. Relationships between contemporary neuroscience and Mātauranga Māori are also considered.
Course Module & Description
Introducing the brain

The New Science of Mind and Brain will begin by reflecting on the wonder and fascination inspired by contemplating the brain – perhaps the most complex object in the known universe – and its relationship to human experience and behaviour. This introductory module will also examine: Mātauranga Māori perspectives; the anatomy of the brain; structure and function of nerve cells; and scientific research methods for studying the brain.

Perceiving the world

How do visual perceptions arise from brain processes? Remarkable progress towards answering this question has been made in recent times. This module will examine the psychology and neuroscience of sensory processes and perception.

The attentive brain

Sometimes we fail to see things right in front of us, even though our eyes are wide open. This module will explore the topic of attention, and consider some everyday problems related to attention and distraction.

Remembering

What is it like to suffer from amnesia? What is the difference between short-term (working) memory and long-term memory? Why do we sometimes misremember things that happened yesterday (or last year)? This module will examine the psychology and neuroscience of memory.

The communicative brain

What is language? How does language develop during infancy and childhood? How is language represented in the brain? New insights about these issues, emerging from research into the psychology and neuroscience of language will be explained.

Thinking and feeling

A range of topics related to thinking and feeling will be discussed in this module. These include: obstacles to problem-solving and how to overcome them; expert problem-solving; mental shortcuts – their upsides and downsides; the psychology and neuroscience of emotions.

The diverse brain

Since we differ from each other in a multitude of fascinating ways, it follows that our brains also differ. This module will examine and celebrate several dimensions of neurodiversity, including the autism spectrum, dyslexia and handedness and ageing. Less well-known examples of neurodiversity such as synaesthesia, aphantasia and anauralia will also be discussed.

The conscious brain

How does conscious experience emerge from activity in brains and bodies? Answering this question is seen by many scholars as the most significant intellectual challenge of our times. In this module we will examine scientific and philosophical attempts to unravel the enigma of the conscious brain.

Students who complete this micro-credential will be able to:

  1. describe the main divisions of the nervous system and the gross anatomy of the brain; and be able to label the principal structures when shown diagrams of individual nerve cells, or diagrams of the human brain
  2. demonstrate an appreciation of relationships between Mātauranga Māori and contemporary neuroscience
  3. critique a range of methods for studying relationships between brain and mind by evaluating their respective advantages and disadvantages
  4. explain the neurocognitive basis of a range of psychological processes and be able to apply this understanding to real-world settings
  5. describe the main features of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum conditions, attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder and developmental dyslexia
  6. describe how a range of psychological processes are affected by healthy ageing, and describe neurocognitive aspects of dementia (especially Alzheimer’s disease)
  7. explain how improved scientific understanding of the neurocognitive basis of psychological processes can alter perceptions of practical issues, and suggest evidence-based solutions.

Upon completion of the course, you will :

  • be awarded with 15 credit points from the University of Auckland
  • be issued with a digital badge from the University of Auckland which you can share across your digital profiles like LinkedIn.

Frequently Asked Questions about this micro-credential

Application FAQs
What are the entry requirements? For admission to this micro-credential you must meet the requirements to study at a New Zealand University (e.g. through University Entrance or an alternative entrance pathway).

What is the date for the next intake? The next intake dates are listed at the top of the page.

Is the course fee a one-off lump sum? Yes, the course fee is a one-off sum of $1,363 for domestic students.

Is this course open to non-resident students? No. Currently our micro-credentials are only open to NZ citizens and permanent residents.

Studying FAQs
Can I study the course in my own time? Is it suitable for those working full-time? Yes. You can study at a time that suits you (within the allocated course dates). Auckland Online courses are designed for working professionals. They are flexible yet structured to help you gain the knowledge in the time you have.

How is the course structured? The course will run over 8 weeks, and will comprise of weekly modules, essentially 1 module per week. Further details on the course structure can be found under the ‘Course Structure’ tab further up on this page.

Assessment FAQs
How will I be assessed? Learners will be assessed through a combination of activities that address the learning objectives from each of the modules in the course. These will comprise knowledge check quizzes, a personal learning reflection, essay and final test.
Benefits FAQs
Does the course enable me to take further study at the University? All our micro-credentials are credit bearing, so that you can progress your studies further towards a degree qualification. Please note, credits will need to be relevant to the programme you wish to study and satisfy the programme’s specific entry requirements. Credit for this micro-credential is awarded at Level 7 on the New Zealand Qualifications and Credentials Framework.

How many course credits will I attain upon completion of the course? Upon completion of the course, you will be awarded with 15 credit points from the University of Auckland at Level 7 on the New Zealand Qualifications and Credentials Framework.

Do I get a certificate at the end? Will it reflect ‘online micro-credential’? Upon successful completion of the course, you will be issued with a digital badge from the University of Auckland which you can share across your digital profiles like LinkedIn.

What employers or professional associations have endorsed the value and industry relevance of the learning outcomes of this micro-credential?

  • The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners
  • New Zealand Audiological Society
  • Department of Corrections: Ara Poutama Aotearoa

*Fees are inclusive of 15% GST, but do not include the Student Services Fee, course books, travel and health insurance, or living costs. Amounts shown are indicative only. In addition to the tuition fee, there is a Student Services Fee of $4.44 per point (online). Fees will be confirmed upon completion of enrolment into courses.

The New Science of Mind and Brain (Online) – Enrol Now

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